Reading ESL stories and readings in English for ESL learners


Future Simple Verb Tense

This is one way to talk about the future. LINK for other ways to talk about the future.

In many cases, the "going to" future can be used in the same ways as the future simple tense.  LINK to "going to" future


 

Form (what it looks like):

 
Affirmative statements Negative statements Example Questions
subject + will + base form of verb subject + will not + base form of verb
subject +
won't + base form of verb
  will + subject + base form
I will drive you home.

I'll drive you home after work.
We'll drive you home after work.
They'll drive you home after work.
I will not drive you home.

I won't drive
you home after work.
She won't drive you home after work.
We won't drive you home after work.
They won't drive you home after work.
driver and passengers in a car Will you drive me home?
Will you drive her home?
Will you drive us home?
Will you drive them home?

Yes, I will.
No, I won't

 


 

Use:

1. unplanned future events, spontaneous

a man with a briefcase walking along a sidewalk wristwatch
'Raketa on my wrist' by wstryder, from flickr
 
It's okay, I'll walk. It's a nice day. Just a second, I'll check.  

 

2. predicting events

many hot air balloons in the sky
photo by Michael Baker, Wikimedia Commons
dark clouds on the horizon
photo by dan, from FreeDigitalPhotos.net
a person running along a road
'Running For The Bus' by beascloset, flickr
Who will win the balloon race?
Perhaps the red and yellow balloon will win.
Will it rain tomorrow?
The weather forecast says that it will rain.
Do you think she'll be late?
If she runs, she won't be late.

 

3. future facts, often with the verb to be

a boy blowing out the candles on his birthday cake
'Mason's 10th Birthday' by spolay, from flickr
a man windsurfing people crossing the street at Dundas Square in Toronto
Nathan will be 10 on his next birthday. It will be warmer once summer arrives. Jane will be in Toronto for the holidays.

 

4. results of a present action (can be similar to a conditional sentence)

two students working on a written assignment together a student sitting at a desk and  writing an exam
'Writing Exams' by ccarlstead, from flickr
a group of people doing exercises together outside
'Aerobics' by Sandvand, from flickr
If you leave John alone, he'll finish his homework faster. Roberto needs to study more or he won't pass his exams. If you exercise more, you'll lose weight faster.

 

5. probability, with the verb to think

Note that don't (or doesn't) can be used to make the negative in this case.

The words suppose, expect, wonder, am sure and doubt if are used in the same way.  NOTE: doubt if has a negative meaning.

a dog watching television
'education - tv' by Maufdi, from flickr
two expensive cars parked in a large driveway
photo by Havel, from Wikimedia Commons
a sidewalk between two high snow banks
I think I'll watch TV tonight.
I think I won't watch TV tonight.
I don't think I'll watch TV tonight.
I suppose I'll watch TV tonight.
I doubt if I'll watch TV tonight.
I think I'll buy that car.
I think I won't buy that car.
I don't think I'll buy that car.
I doubt if I'll buy that car.
I expect I won't buy that car.
She thinks it'll snow this afternoon.
She thinks it won't snow this afternoon.
She doesn't think it will snow this afternoon.
I wonder if it'll snow this afternoon.
I expect it'll snow this afternoon.

 

6. for making promises